Redmire News from The Times



The Times
Monday, September 4, 1843 (p.3)

NATIONAL SOCIETY for PROMOTING the EDUCATION of the POOR
in the Principles of the Established Church throughout 
England and Wales.

...

Contributors of 10 
...

Rev. J. Calvert, Redmire, Yorks.

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The Times
Tuesday, April 24, 1860 (p.6)

HOUSE OF COMMONS, MONDAY, APRIL 23

PETITIONS

Petitions against the Wine License Bill were presented 
by Mr. CAYLEY, from Middlesbrough (2), Tees, Tilery, 
Redmire, and Bolton; ...

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The Times
Tuesday, November 4, 1862 (p.12)

A well-contested match at rifle-shooting took place at
Ripon on Wednesday last, between eight members of the 
Ripon Volunteer Corps and the same number of the Redmire 
corps.  The distances were 200, 500, and 600 yards, three
shots at each.  The Redmire party made a total score of 
257, and the Ripon one of 252.  Thus Redmire won by five
points.


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The Times
Thursday, October 10, 1867 (p.10)

The Wensleydale and Richmond Volunteers have shot a match
on the Redmire range at 200 and 500 yards, resulting in 
favour of the former company by 16 points.  The prizes open
to all competitors were won chiefly by Mr. Chapman, Mr.
Allen, and Mr. Skedmore, Wensleydale, and by Mr. Hill, 
Richmond.  

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The Times
Thursday, January 4, 1906 (p.10)

ECCLESIASTICAL INTELLIGENCE

...


The Guardian publishes the following list of preferments
and appointments, in addition to others already announced
in The Times :-  ...  Rev. W. Robinson, perpetual curate 
of Bolton-cum-Redmire, Leyburn -- patron, the rector of 
Wensley; ...

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The Times
Monday, July 12, 1909 (p.1)

MARRIAGES

OTHER:WELLS -- On the 29th June, at St. Ambrose Church, 
Bournemouth, by the Revd. J.I. Patterson, THOMAS ARCHER
WINDSOR, only son of the late THOMAS WILLIAM OTHER, of 
Elms House, Redmire, Yorkshire, and of Mrs. North, Coverham
Abbey, Bournemouth, to ELEANOR BEATRICE, younger daughter
of HENRY BLATCH WELLS, of "Stalham," Studland-road, 
Bournemouth.

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The Times
Monday, November 13, 1911 (p.13)

CO-OPERATION IN AGRICULTURE

The North-Eastern Counties Agricultural Organization 
Committee, formed in May of last year, has now been 
incorporated with the Agricultural Organization Society, 
and will in future continue its operations over Yorkshire,
Durham, and Northumberland as the north-eastern section of
the Agricultural Organization Society.  Mr. Philip Burtt
is chairman of the section, Lord Wenlock is president, 
Sir Hugh Bell is hon. treasurer, and the vice-presidents
include Lord Zetland, Lord Harewood, Mr. Herbert Samuel,
M.P., Mr. J. Lloyd Wharton, Mr. W.G.A. Orde-Powlett, M.P.,
and Mr. Arthur F. Pease.

The section starts with the advantage of a substantial 
membership in societies at Brandsby, Northallerton, 
Barnard Castle, Redmire, and Helmsley, all of which market
their produce by co-operative methods, whilst three of them
apply these methods to the purchase of feeding stuffs, 
manures, seeds, implements, and in one case even to coal.
But the activities of the section will not be restricted to
trading.  The intention is to do everything possible to open
up outlying districts, and as the vice-presidents include 
several directors of the North-Eastern Railway and the 
Postmaster-General the section is in a unique position for 
achieving its purpose of "rendering material assistance in 
the direction of securing improved telephone, telegraph, 
and railway communications."
 

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The Times
Friday, December 13, 1912 (p.64)

AGRICULTURAL CO-OPERATION 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF FARMING

An informal conference on Agricultural Organization was 
held at the Station Hotel, York, on Wednesday when Lord
Shaftesbury was entertained at luncheon by the local 
committee of the North-Eastern branch of the Agricultural
Organization Society.  This society has been reconstituted
by arrangement with the Board of Agriculture and the 
Development Commissioners, and a new board of governors was
recently elected.

Lord Shaftsbury, who is chairman of the board of governors,
has been making a tour through various parts of Yorkshire 
and Durham, and on Monday, in company with Sir Hugh Bell, 
he visited the recently built dairy and depot at the 
Wensleydale Farmers' Society, where he was met by a number
of farmers on the local committee at Redmire.  Afterwards 
the party went on to Reeth, meeting the committee of the 
Swaledale Farmers' Society, and then through Richmond to 
Northallerton, where the depot of the Wensleydale Pure Milk
Society was inspected.

....


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The Times
Thursday, September 25, 1913

LEGACY TO A WASHERWOMAN

MISS DAVIDSON, of Redmire, Wensleydale, who was nearly 90 
years of age, has left by her will 25,000 to a washerwoman
named Fawcett, of Bellerby.  Several brothers are left the
same amount, and Wesleyan Home and Foreign Missions are the
residuary legatees.  Miss Davidson was the daughter of a 
Manchester manufacturer, and the total amount of her estate
is 200,000.

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The Times
Monday, November 24, 1913 (p.11)

MISS SARAH ANN DAVISON, of Redmire, Yorks, who died on 
September 19, aged 76, daughter of Mr. John Davison, left
estate of the gross value of 18,423, of which 13,718 is
net personalty.  She bequeathed the residue of her estate
in equal shared to the Wesleyan Methodist Ministry Society
and the Wesleyan Methodist Home Missionary Society.  At 
the time of the death of Miss Davison it was stated that 
she had left 25,000 to a washerwoman named Fawcett and her
fortune was then "expected to amount to over 200,000."


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The Times
Saturday, March 18, 1916 (p.10)

THE TIMES FUND

[List of contributors to the 'Times Fund' for 
caring for war wounded]

...
Bolton-cum-Redmire churches, 2 11s.
...

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The Times
Saturday, December 23, 1916 (p.10)

CHURCH APPOINTMENTS

The Lord Chancellor has settled the following appointments
to benefices in his gift :- ... the Rev. W. ROBINSON, vicar
of Bolton with Redmire, Yorks, to the rectory of Kirton, 
Suffolk.

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The Times
Friday, March 16, 1917 (p.9)

CHURCH APPOINTMENTS

...
the REV. W. THOMASON, curate of Wensley, to the vicarage
of Bolton Castle with Redmire, Yorks -- patron, the rector
of Wensley; ...


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The Times
Monday, November 19, 1917 (p.2)

LOSSES IN THE RANKS
(Continued)

..
Shields, 23287 F.K. (Redmire) 
...

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The Times
Thursday, January 20, 1927 (p.15)

SPENSLEY, Mr. Metcalfe (81) of Castle Bank, Redmire, 
Yorks. sheep breeder and cattle dealer interested in 
Yorkshire Farmers Limited, and The Wensleydale Pure 
Milk Company (net personalty 27,245) .... 39,392.

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The Times
Thursday, November 8, 1928 (p.18)

MISSING AIRMEN FOUND DEAD
MACHINE WRECKED ON MOOR

Pilot Officer Charles L. Myers and Aircraftman H. Chadwick, 
who left Catterick Aerodrome, Yorkshire, on Tuesday morning
on a photographic flight in the vicinity, and failed to 
return, were found dead about 3 p.m. yesterday amid the 
wreckage of their machine on an almost inaccessible ridge on
Preston Moor, west of Bellerby.  The aeroplane had crashed on 
boggy ground, and the bodies were almost buried in mud, little
more than the feet being visible.

Searchers who scoured a great stretch of wild, open moorland
throughout Tuesday night failed to find any clue to the 
whereabouts of the aeroplane, and at dawn yesterday another 
search began.  Four aeroplanes left Catterick Aerodrome to 
cooperate, and police from all parts of the North Riding, 
troops from Catterick Camp and Richmond garrison, and hundreds
of volunteers took part.  A small army of motorists searched 
the countryside so far as the roads would permit, and the 
aeroplanes were dispatched to see if the more inaccessible 
spots could yield any trace of the missing machine.

The district is one of the wildest and loneliest in North 
Yorkshire.  Much of the higher ground is thickly heather-clad
and the lower parts are heavily wooded.  It is full of deep
depressions and masked ravines, and homesteads are so widely
separated that the majority of the inhabitants had no 
knowledge that the aeroplane was missing.

It appears that Mr. Thomas Robinson, of Redmire, was out 
working in a field on Tuesday afternoon when he heard the 
noise of an aeroplane overhead.  He paid little attention 
to it, as it is a frequent occurrence in the neighbourhood
of Catterick.  He saw in the newspapers yesterday morning
that an aeroplane was missing, and at once reported the 
circumstances to the local police, who directed the search
into this area.

The wreckage was first sighted by Flying Officer Lambie, 
from a scout aeroplane, and, with the position roughly 
noted, he returned to Catterick and headed a motor party 
accompanied by an ambulance.  Owing, however, to the extent
of the moor the exact spot which he had observed could not 
be found, and Lambie had to return again to camp and fly 
over the moor once more, signalling the position to those 
who had accompanied him in the car.  This proved to be an 
almost inaccessible spot, and, owing to the boggy nature of
the ground, motor-cars and ambulance could not be got within
a mile of it.  

When the rescuers arrived they found that both the wrecked
machine and the men were half-buried in the bog.  The machine
had evidently nose-dived.  There was great difficulty in 
getting the bodies away from the wreckage, as they had 
virtually to be dug out of the soil, and it was 5 o'clock 
before it was possible to liberate them.  They were afterwards
coveyed to the inn at Redmire.

It is believed that the inquest will take place to-day at 
Redmire, but it is possible that it may be held at Catterick
for the convenience of witnesses.

Pilot Officer Myers, who was 20 years of age, lived at 
Bailgate, Lincoln.  He passed out of the Sealand Flying 
School four weeks ago and had a record of 14 hours flying
time when he started on the ill-fated flight, which was 
expected to last an hour.

Aircraftman Chadwick was 21 years of age.  His home address
was 25, Gerrard-street, Preston, and joined the Air Force 
three years ago.

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The Times
November 9, 1928 (p.13)

AIRMEN'S DEATH ON MOOR
VERDICT AT INQUEST

A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned yesterday at 
the inquest at Redmire, Yorkshire, on the bodies of Pilot
Officer Charles Lilburn Myers and Aircraftmas Henry 
Chadwick, who lost their lives when their machine crashed 
on a lonely stretch of moorland lying between Wensleydale 
and Swaledale, North Yorkshire, on Tuesday.

The inquest was held by Mr. J.G. Gardner, the North Riding
Coroner, in a room of the Bolton Arms, Redmire, within two
miles of the place where the accident occurred.  The two 
men left Catterick Aerodrome on Tuesday for a short flight, 
but failed to return, and it was only after a search lasting
30 hours that their bodied were found lying among the 
wreckage of the machine.

THE CORONER, addressing the jury, said he did not think that
anyone was to blame, and it was possible that the machine 
had got into a spin.

Evidence of identity was given by Flight Lieutenant H. Penman,
R.A.F. Medical Service, who said that Myers was 20 years of 
age and Chadwick 21.  Both men had received such injuries
that death was instantaneous.

Flight Lieutenant Hebbert said that he detailed the men for
their flight on duty.  In his opinion, it was quite a good
morning for flying.  The object of the flight was to train 
pilots to pick out certain points and take pinpoint 
photographs.

THE CORONER -- Did the weather remain good enough all the 
morning? -- Yes.  I went up later.  The clouds, however, 
seemed to be dropping.  Myers left Catterick Aerodrome at
10.15 on Tuesday morning, and knew that the machine was 
wanted again at 11 o'clock.  Myers had flown over the 
surrounding country before and was a competent pilot.  He
had previously flown this machine.

THE CORONER -- It struck me as possible that in the fog he
came down to see where he was and descended lower than he 
thought.

THE WITNESS -- The place where he should have been was about
1,000ft. above the sea-level.  WHere the crash occurred is 
above 1,500ft.

THE CORONER -- What is your theory?  Do you think mine 
likely?  -- It is very difficult to say.  It looks as though
they had got into a spin.

Thomas Robson, a farmer of Redmire, said that it was very 
misty on Tuesday in the moors, and he could not see his hands
before him.  He heard an aeroplan coming across.  It was 
making a funny noise, and two or three minutes afterwards
the engines stopped.  Two or three minutes later he heard a 
thud, but did not know whether it was from the moor or from
the quarry.  He said nothing that day, but next morning as 
he heard that two men were missing, he reported the matter.

Rigger Lambert gave evidence that the machine was inspected 
immediately before its flight and was in perfect order.  They
had never had any complaints about it.

THE CORONRER said that he could not see anyone was to blame.
He thought that the machine had got into a spin.  Sometimes
flying men got into a fog, and instead of returning home 
hoped to pass through it, and so got deeper into it.


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The Times
Saturday, April 2, 1932
(also appeared Saturday, April 9, 1932)

To be SOLD, pursuant to an Order of the High Court of 
Justice, made in an action re: Wensleydale Pure Milk Society,
Ltd.  Jones v. the Company 1931 W.1680 with the approbation
of Mr. Justice Bennett, by Mr. M.W. Darwin of Northallerton
Auctions, Ltd. the person appointed by said Judge at The 
Dairy, Northallerton, Yorkshire, on Wednesday, the 27th day
of April, 1932, at 2:30 o'clock in the afternoon, in two 
lots.

LOT 1

ALL THOSE BUSINESS LEASEHOLD PREMISES known as
THE WENSLEYDALE PURE MILK SOCIETY LIMITED.  THE DAIRY,
NORTHALLERTON, THE DAIRY, REDMIRE, THE DAIRY, WEST BURTON,
together with
THE GOODWILL and EXISTING CONTRACTS; THE PLANT and MACHINERY
at the DAIRY, NORTHALLERTON, THE DAIRY, REDMIRE, and THE 
DAIRY, WEST BURTON, INCLUDING THREE FORD TRUCKS, APPROXIMATELY
1,000 MILK CANS, 200 GROSS MILK BOTTLES, AND 600 BOTTLE CASES.

LOT 2

FREEHOLD DWELLINGHOUSE AT WEST WITTON, LEYBURN, NORTH RIDING,
YORKSHIRE, WITH THE WOODEN GARAGE, STABLE, AND OUTBUILDINGS
THERETO BELONGING, TOGETHER WITH TWO SMALL GARDENS IN FRONT
AND ALSO A PEW IN WEST WITTON CHURCH.

Particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained of the 
Auctioneer, Northallerton Auctions, Limited, Northallerton;
L.D. Kidson, Esq., the Receiver and Manager (Messrs. Kidsons,
Taylor, and Co., Chartered Accountants)  1. Booth-street,
Manchester; Messrs. Vandrey, Osborne and Mellor.  30.  St. 
Ann Street, Manchester, Solicitors; and of Messrs. Hedley 
Norris and Co., of 45. Lincoln's Inn, London WC2, Solicitors.

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The Times
Thursday, September 6, 1934

5th DIVISION'S FINAL EXERCISE
OCCUPATION OF "TYKELAND"

CATTERICK, Sept. 5

The final exercise of the 5th Division was carried out in 
the Catterick area yesterday.  It was intended that the 
exercise should continue until this morning, but owing to 
a surprising and unexpected development the exercise was 
concluded about 9 o'clock last night.  Troops marched to
their assembly areas on Monday afternoon and bivouacked for
the night.  The 13th Infantry Brigade Group went to Redmire,
the 14th Infantry Bridge Group to Reeth, and the 15th 
Infantry Bridge Group to the Half-penny House area. ...

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The Times
Wednesday, January 2, 1935 (p.13)

FORTHCOMING MARRIAGES

Mr. W.R. BURRILL-ROBINSON AND MISS H.M. LISTER

The engagement is announced between William Robinson 
Burrill-Robinson, of ELm House, Redmire, Yorkshire, and 
Henrietta Mabel Lister, of Bathurst Mews, Hyde Park, 
London, daughter of the late Dr. Charles and Mrs. Lister.

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The Times
Wednesday, August 10, 1938

GROUSE SHOOTING
PROSPECTS IN NORTH YORKSHIRE

Parties are already arriving for grouse shooting on the 
lower Wensleydale moors, and the latest reports aver that
conditions on the whole are moderate.

Lord and Lady Bolton, of Bolton Hall, are entertaining the 
Marquess and Marchioness of Exexter, the Earl and Countess 
of Stair, the Earl and Countess of Macclesfield, the Earl 
of Powis, the Bishop of Blackburn, and the Hon. Mrs. Herbert, 
the Hon. Nigel Orde-Powlett, and Mr. W. Batty for the opening
day's shoot.

Prospects on the extensive Pen Hill and Melmerby moors are 
declared to be fairly good, with broods well forward.  These
moor will be opened out by Mr. T. Thornton-Berry (last year's
High Sherrif of Yorkshire), of Swinithwaite Hall.  Among his
party will be Lieutenant-Colonel F. Sopper, Brigadier-General
W. Allgood, Colonel A. Begbie, Major Douglas-Collins, Dr. F.
Ord, Captain C. Leather, and Mr. C. Wright.

Viscount and Viscountess Swinton's party at Swinton, who will
open out the celebrated Pott and Colsterdale moors, will 
include the Belgian Ambassador and Viscount Monsell.  Here 
sport should be very good, as birds are plentiful.

Lord Rochdale's party at Gunnerside Lodge, Richmond, will 
shoot over the Upper Swaledale and Gunnerside moors, where 
the prospects are very favourable.  The most recent reports
show that birds are further forward than for many years.

Mr. W.R. Burrell-Robinson, of Elm House, Redmire, has
decided not to open out his Coverhead moors, where grouse 
are in excellent condition, until later on in the month.

Preparations on the Farndale and Arkengarthdale moors for 
the "Twelfth" are nicely in hand, and shooting will be fairly
general on the opening day.  Although results may be "patchy,"
the birds are healthy and well forward.  There is a good 
crop of heather on these moors.

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The Times
Wednesday, March 8, 1944

HUNDREDS OF SHEEP LOST UNDER SNOW
WINTRY SNAP IN YORKSHIRE

Hundreds of sheep were lost in snowdrifts in the Yorkshire
dales during the week-end of February 26-27, and in one 
part road traffic was held up until a snow plough and gangs
of roadmen cut a way through.

Four to six inches of snow fell on the level, and drifts 
from six to 10 feet deep formed on the road between Redmire
and Carperby, in Wensleydale, where the snow plough and road-
men were employed throughout the week-end before traffic was
restored to normal.  Farmers worked in small groups to rescue
their sheep from drifts more than 8ft. deep in Upper Coverdale
and on West Bolton moors.  Many of the sheep were rescued and 
suffered little, but in Wharfedale and elsewhere farmers could
not ascertain their losses until some time later.

Frost followed the snow, and at Leyburn 10deg. of frost were 
registered.  Part of the River Ure between Middleham Bridge
and Spennithorne Shallows was frozen, and telephone wires
were down in Wensleydale.


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The Times
Wednesday, January 5, 1949

Mr. GEORGE GRAHAM

Mr. George Graham, who died suddenly on New Year's Day, as 
already briefly announced, was for a time president of the 
Society of Yorkshire Artists, and began life as a student of
architecture under Thomas Dyer, of Leeds, where, the son of
Michael Graham, he was born in 1881.

He was, however, destined to become a very accomplished painter
of landscapes in oil and water-colour and engraver on wood for
printing in colours.  Graham was educated at Roundhay, Leeds.
He started working with Dyer at the age of 18 and remained 
with him for two years, meanwhile attending the Leeds School 
of Art for lessons in drawing.  He then went to London, where 
he studied drawing and painting under Sir Frank Brangwyn, R.A.,
J.M. Swan, R.A., and Sir William Nicholson.  Graham was an 
early and regular exhibitor at the Royal Academy, showing 
French, English, and Scottish landscapes in oil and water-colour,
distinguished by restrained poetical feeling and a clear and 
broad style of execution.  His early architectural training was
recalled by his firm drawing of buildings.  He excelled, perhaps,
in winter scenes.  As recently as 1947 he was represented at
the Royal Academy by an oil painting of Romney Marsh.

For a good-many years Graham had lived at Winchelsea in Sussex,
and he was honorary secretary of the Society of Sussex Artists.
Besides exhibiting at the Academy he exhibited at the Royal 
Institute of Oil Painters, to which he was elected in 1918,
the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours, to which 
he was elected in 1922, the Glasgow Institute, and the Walker
Art Gallery, Liverpool.  In 1927 he was elected a member of 
the Royal Scottish Water Colour Society and later was elected
to the R.B.A.  He is represented in the public collections of 
Bradford, Leeds, Worthing, Eastbourne, Swansea, Blackpool,
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Oldham, Southport, Paisley, Brighton, 
Birmingham, Hastings, Liverpool, Darlington, and Hove.  His
almost lifelong deafness threw him very much upon his own 
resources and perhaps gave an edge to his appreciation of 
Beethoven, whose music he admired above all other. 

In 1915 Graham married Catherine, daughter of the Rev. C. Pauli, 
vicar of Redmire, Yorkshire, where he formerly lived.  There
were no children of the marriage.

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The Times
Wednesday, February 11, 1953

SNOWSTORMS AND GALES
MANY MAIN ROADS BLOCKED
VILLAGES ISOLATED

A blizzard which raged for many hours yesterday in parts 
of Northern England and Wales cut off several villages, 
blocked many main roads, and disorganized traffic.

Wensleydale, in Yorkshire, caught the worst force of a 
storm that raged for 15 hours.  Waldendale, a 10-mile-long
valley, was isolated and, with great snowdrifts in the dales,
sheep farmers feared that hundreds of sheep would be lost.
The villages of Redmire and Carlton were cut off from public
transport.

...

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The Times
Tuesday, August 11, 1953


PROSPECTS FOR "THE TWELFTH"
...

BEATERS SCARCE

Alderman W.R. Burrill-Robinson, of Elm House, Redmire, 
owner of Coverhead moors, hopes to shoot with his party 
about the middle of August.  A local difficulty, which 
he thinks other shoots may also face, is that of getting
the assistance of beaters during the delayed hay harvest.

...

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The Times
Friday, July 29, 1955 

WILLS AND BEQUESTS

SPENSLEY, Mr. John Metcalfe, of Redmire, Yorkshire, 
farmer.  (net 66,871; duty paid 10,125) ...95,585.

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The Times
Saturday, August 10, 1957


Field Sports
Grouse Shooting Prospects
 
...

In most of Yorkshire there are prospects of a thoroughly 
good year, particularly on the moors which were lightly
shot last year to leave foundation stocks.  Lord Bolton 
reports abundant results from this policy on the Bolton 
Hall moors in Wensleydale, reckoned among the best in the
country.  The Prime Minister will be among his guests next
week.  In Coverdale, Mr. Burrill-Robinson, of Redmire, 
states that he has never seen so many young birds so 
strong on the wing so early in the season.

...

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The Times
Friday, May 2, 1958

ECCLESIASTICAL NEWS
CHURCH APPOINTMENTS

The REV. T.R. CARLIN, vicar of Bolton with Redmire, 
diocese of Ripon, to be vicar of Bugthorpe, diocese
of York.


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The Times
Tuesday, August 11, 1959

MODERATE PROPSECTS FOR THE "12TH"
GROUSE SCARCE, SECOND BROODS PROMISING

LEYBURN, YORKSHIRE, AUG. 10

Grouse shooting prospects in some of the Yorkshire dales are
generally reported as "moderate."  Various owners of shoots
and gamekeepers have stated that grouse are scarce.

There has been some disease here and there, but the heather
is a month forward, therefore there is plenty of food, and 
the second broods especially are thriving.  Crops of heather,
over the past two seasons, have been poor.

Lord Swinton, who lives at Masham, will shoot on the 12th.
His party will include the Prime Minister, Lord Crathorne, 
Lord Masham, Captain C. York, Mr. R.W. Thompson, and Mr. 
J. Jameson.  Lord Bolton, who lives at Leyburn, will shoot 
over the Low Moor on Wednesday.  His party will include 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Orde-Powlett and Mr. Christopher 
Orde-Powlett, Mr. Richard Scrope, Mr. Druid Chaytor, Mr. 
Frank Lloyd, and Mr. A. Kemp.

Alderman W.R. Burrill-Robinson, of Redmire, who owns 
Coverhead moors, described the prospects as "patchy." 
Grouse were not plentiful but second broods were promising.
Shooting over Coverhead will not take place until the end 
of this month.  Reports of fewer grouse than usual have 
also been given in Walden and some of the upper Wensleydale
moorlands, but shooters in Swaledale and Dallowgill hold 
out better prospects.

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The Times
Monday, December 24, 1962
(repeated on Thursday, December 27, 1962)

BURRILL-ROBINSON -- On December 23rd, 1962, at Elm House, 
Redmire, WILLIAM ROBINSON BURRILL-ROBINSON.  Service at 
St. Mary's Church, Redmire, on Thursday at 2:30pm.  No 
letters, please.

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The Times
Monday, June 24, 1963

BURRILL-ROBINSON, Mr. William Robinson, of Redmire, near
Leyburn, Yorkshire, former chairman of North Riding County
Council (gross 122,691) (duty paid 32,695) ..119,409

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The Times
Wednesday, April 22, 1964

Mr. Robert Hewitt Chapman, of Pennyacre, Thornton Rust, 
Leyburn, Yorkshire, has been granted the Queen's license
and authority to take the surname of Robinson in addition
to and after that of Chapman and to bear the arms of 
Robinson of Redmire.

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The Times
Friday, May 2, 1972

Residential Property

Small country estates in Wensleydale, North Riding, are not
often available, because much of the land is contained in 
large hereditary estates.  An exception is Elm House, Redmire, 
near Leyburm a property which covers about 21 acres and is 
almost surrounded by Lord Bolton's estate.

The house is of Georgian origin with Victorian additions and
stands on rising ground overlooking Wensleydale, but is 
protected from the moors behind by a belt of woods.  It has 
three reception rooms, a gun room, and six main and three 
secondary bedrooms.  There are outbuildings and a small 
entrance lodge.  A price about 20,000 is expected and 
the agents are Jackson-Stops and Staff, of York.

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The Times
Saturday, March 6, 1976

[Classified Ad, repeats through 1976/1977]

WENSLEYDALE.  Self-catering flats and cottages, sleep 2-8. 
Vacancies early and late season, S.a.e. Ingram.  Elm House,
Redmire, Leyburn, N. Yorks.  Tel.: Leyburn 2313.


(alternate version)

WENSLEYDALE.  In secluded grounds of large country house,
with fine views, self-catering and Norwegian log houses.
Sleep 2-8.  Fully equipped, plus TV.  Vacancies early and 
late season.  S.A.E.: Ingram.  ELm House, Redmire, Leyburn,
N. Yorks.  Tel.: Leyburn 2313.

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The Times
Thursday, January 12, 1978

Church News
Appointments

The Rev. M.E. Brown, Vicar of Aysgarth, diocese of Ripon, 
to be also priest-in-charge of Bolton-with-Redmire.